“Competitive Bidding Explained,” Florida Condo & HOA Law Blog

“Competitive Bidding Explained,” Florida Condo & HOA Law Blog

Q: My condominium association recently solicited bids for major repairs to our condominium buildings. The cost of the project is several hundred thousand dollars. At the recent board meeting where the contractor was selected, the board discussed all of the bids and voted to proceed with a particular contractor. However, this contractor was not the lowest bid received. When the association must put out contracts for bid, isn’t it obligated to go with the lowest price? (C. J., via e-mail)

A: No. Section 718.3026(1) of the Florida Condominium Act applies to contracts for the purchase of materials or equipment and the provision of services. Any such contract that requires payment of an amount that exceeds five percent of the total annual budget of the association, including reserves, requires competitive bids.

People often ask if three bids are required by the statute. I believe the reference to “competitive” bids means that two bids are sufficient, though there is certainly nothing wrong with getting more. It is important that bids be for the same scope of work, however.

As to your specific question, the statute states that “nothing contained herein shall be construed to require the association to accept the lowest bid.”

It is also important to remember that certain contracts are exempt from the competitive bidding requirements of the statute. Exemptions include contracts for hiring association employees, as well as contracts with accountants, architects, association managers, engineers, landscape architects, and attorneys.

Section 720.3055(1) of the Florida Homeowners’ Association Act contains similar requirements for homeowners’ associations, although the obligation to obtain bids under this statute only arises when the proposed contract exceeds ten percent of the association’s annual budget, including reserves.

As with many issues in community association operations that are regulated by statute, it is also important to remember that the governing documents for an association can impose stricter requirements than regulations contained in the law.

Q: Our condominium has some different factions. I agree with one group and others are part of a second group. I recently ran for the board and lost by only a few votes. Right after the annual meeting, one of the people from the other group, who had not been up for election because she still had one year left on the board, resigned. The rest of the board then appointed one of their supporters to fill that seat. We think I should have been appointed to that seat and that this whole thing was rigged and underhanded. What do you think? (L.S., via e-mail)

A: Condo politics can be as rough as any. Unless there is a very unusual provision in your bylaws, candidates who run for the board but are not elected have no greater claims to vacancies that open up on the board than anyone else.

Section 718.112(2)(d)9 of the Florida Condominium Act states that vacancies occurring on a board are filled by majority vote of the remaining directors, even if they constitute less than a quorum. Vacancies are filled for the unexpired term of the seat being filled, unless otherwise provided in the bylaws.

Q: We just had the annual meeting for our homeowners’ association and I was elected to the board. Our manager said we have to now do an “annual MRTA review” but he was not exactly sure what that was, nor are we. Can you shed any light on this subject? (C.F., via e-mail)

A: MRTA is the common abbreviation used for Florida’s Marketable Record Title Act, which is Chapter 712 of the Florida Statutes. It is a rather complicated real estate statute, but of interest to you, it can extinguish your covenants after 30 years if certain steps are not taken to protect them by certain recordings. The Florida Homeowners’ Association Act was amended in 2018 to require the board of every HOA, at the first meeting of the board each year (excluding the organizational meeting) to review the association’s status under MRTA.

Joe Adams is an attorney with Becker & Poliakoff, P.A., Fort Myers. Send questions to Joe Adams by e-mail to jadams@beckerlawyers.com. Past editions may be viewed at floridacondohoalawblog.com.